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Monday, January 16, 2017
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  • Friday, January 13, 2017 4:00 AM
    The clock struck Midnight and we welcomed in a New Year and a New You, right? Well that is the hope for many Americans anyways. Fifty-eight percent of Americans report making New Year resolutions and 42.4 percent of those report failing each year. So what can you do to succeed at our goal for a new you, how about instead of restricting yourself from something you encourage the addition of a new behavior. This year I made a goal to put down my phone and pick up a book. So far I have succeeded at reading one book. Pretty good considering we are only a week into the new year. This book has inspired me to share with everyone a new way of eating that will help everyone love their food and quit feeling guilt over food choices. It is called Intuitive Eating: A Revolutionary Program that Works; By: Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resch. 
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  • Friday, January 13, 2017 4:00 AM
    Note from Dick Wolfsie: This month marks 10 years since the passing of famed political humorist Art Buchwald. In 2006 I wrote about our first meeting in 1967 and our final goodbye almost 40 years later. It means a great deal to me to reprint this two-part story in celebration of his life. When I first wrote this column in 2006, Art Buchwald was in hospice. He wanted to spend his final days with friends and family. This is my memory of the first time our paths crossed.
    From my very first day of college in September of 1965 at George Washington University in Washington, D.C., I wanted to meet Art Buchwald. His office, on Pennsylvania Avenue, was just down the street from my dorm.
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  • Friday, January 13, 2017 4:00 AM
    As many of us know, youth are risk-takers. There are countless studies and theories as to why youth participate in risk-taking behaviors, and even scientific studies on teen brain development which may hold some more logical answers. Many youth yearn to feel included with their peers, so they set their pragmatism aside and, unfortunately, some make decisions based on an emotional need to feel that inclusion. When synthetic cannabinoids hit the shelves years ago, the risk-taking behavior of some teens led them to try this substance. In 2015 only 2.5 percent of Indiana 11th graders and 2.1 percent of Indiana 12th graders report using the substance on a monthly basis. This percentage has decreased since the Indiana Youth Survey began surveying students on their usage of the substance in 2013.
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  • Doesn’t matter where you are as long as family is there
    Thursday, January 12, 2017 4:00 AM
    My couple this week met at Hardee’s when she worked there and he and his pals went in to drink coffee. However, it wasn’t but a few months that she brought the group back to Zach’s. I say back to Zach’s because she had worked for us five years during her CHS school days. Second time around was 1987 until we closed in ’96. As per her high school involvement, mainly, she just worked. After all, there was lots of entertainment at the restaurant, someone to hassle or someone hassling her, in a good way, of course. It was a fun place most of the time!
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  • Thursday, January 12, 2017 4:00 AM
    “Oppose all forms of domestic and international human trafficking of adults and children, including sex trafficking and labor trafficking” is a stated national position of the League of Women Voters. It’s shocking to realize that human trafficking is probably going on right here in Montgomery County. Last year there were more than 160 cases affecting youth in Indiana alone. An eye-opening presentation about the problem was given to the League by Kate Kimmer who is Regional Coalition Coordinator, Indiana Trafficking Victims Assistance Program (ITVAP), Indiana Youth Services Association. She left us all stunned with the seriousness of the problem.
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  • Wednesday, January 11, 2017 4:00 AM
    For most of my life, I have been seeking internal peace. The Christian scriptures call it “the peace that passeth understanding.” Growing up in the church, I was taught that it was something one could attain if they were diligent. But no matter how hard I prayed or worked, or how diligently I followed the rules, true inner peace was never to be found.
    Two years ago, on the streets of Berlin, an event took place that was so heinous it jarred my innermost being. In one fell swoop, everything I had ever believed about God, religion, and the life I had been leading was jerked away. A fire and strength I had never known welled up inside of me, propelling me to pack my bags and take the next flight off the continent. Thus began my journey into a world that was truly foreign to me.
    I finally realized that the only path to peace is to discover truth. Lies and falsehoods can temporarily soothe a mind that is desperate for relief from an antagonist, but when you have truth, you can settle the heart and mind on what is real.
    So, over the past 24 months, I have sought the truth about myself, about God, and about the world around me. This led me back to Berlin to face the demons I had tried to leave behind.
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  • Tuesday, January 10, 2017 4:00 AM
    I don’t know why it’s tough to find good sales people these days, but it sure feels like it. Whether it’s here at the world-wide HQ of the media empire that houses the little newspaper that could or at some of the many fine businesses around us, hiring managers tell me it’s a lot harder than it used to be.
    Of course we are currently looking for really good sales staff (Know of someone? Call me!) and I was deeply lost in thought on where to look when the phone suddenly rang and startled me out of a mound of resumes.
    “The Paper. Timmons,” I answered. (Yes, we professional news types are men of few words.)
    “This here’s Mr. Trump’s executive administrative supervisory director of media,” the voice on the other end said.
    “This here’s”?
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  • Monday, January 09, 2017 4:00 AM
    The Indiana General Assembly reconvened for the 2017 legislative session last week.
    This year, state lawmakers will work to craft the next two-year state budget, which will fund all state government services, including education, infrastructure and public safety.
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  • Monday, January 09, 2017 4:00 AM
    I continue to be amazed that, when asked what the number one killer of women is, the majority of women respond, “breast cancer.” While breast cancer is the number one cancer killer of women, and is estimated to have claimed about 40,000 women last year, it is not the biggest threat women face. Heart disease kills 10 times as many.
    Cardiovascular disease is arguably the most important women’s health issue and is largely preventable. How can women be so aware that they have a one in 31 chance of dying from breast cancer, but not the much higher one in three chance of dying from heart disease? Could it be that breast cancer is so much more visible in popular media? Perhaps it’s that breast cancer is generally more frightening and potentially disfiguring. Let’s face it, heart disease is just plain boring to talk about.
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  • Friday, January 06, 2017 4:00 AM
    Just like heroin, methamphetamine is not a drug used by many teenagers. Indiana’s meth use among youth is 0.5 percent, which is a slightly lower than youth use of heroin.
    It’s still a number we need to be concerned about, even one teen using meth is too many.
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  • Friday, January 06, 2017 4:00 AM
    This is part two of my THANKS and NO THANKS to the people, places and things that sparked ideas for my weekly newspaper columns in 2016.
    THANKS to Sam’s Club and Costco for offering a plump, perfectly cooked rotisserie chicken for five bucks. While in one of the stores last month to purchase one for dinner, I picked up a new iPad, some printer ink and two cases of imported beer. “How can they possibly afford to sell an entire cooked chicken for only $4.95?” I asked the lady at the check-out.
    “Got me,” she said. “Your total is $352.00. Enjoy your dinner.”
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  • Friday, January 06, 2017 4:00 AM
    Wow, another year has come and gone. We are in the year of 2017 and we have a new President and a new administration. So now we will see what president elect Donald Trump can do with our nation as president.
    The following are people who have been caught defrauding the veterans system. A man of the Boston area has been sentenced to a year of probation for stealing nearly $80,000 in federal veterans’ benefits that were erroneously sent to his dead neighbor. Prosecutors say 73-year-old John Ladd was sentenced Tuesday to spend the first six months of probationary period in home confinement and the was ordered to pay full restitution to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. He pleaded guilty in August to stealing public money. Prosecutors say Ladd was a caretaker for the woman who died in 2009. The US. Department of Veterans Affairs was not properly notified of the death and continued to deposit her benefits into her bank account each month. Ladd wrote 70 checks to himself from the neighbor’s account, forging her signature, and deposited them into his own account. 
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  • Thursday, January 05, 2017 4:00 AM
    January 9 marks the birthday of Carrie Chapman Catt, founder of the League of Women Voters. Catt was one of the key leaders of the suffrage movement and had an impressive life. Born in 1859 in Wisconsin, she graduated valedictorian of her 1880 class at Iowa Agricultural College (now Iowa State University) in just three years and was the only female in her class!
    Catt was appointed superintendent of the Mason City Schools when she was just 24 years old and was one of the few female superintendents in the country at that time. In 1887, Catt began her crusade for woman suffrage when she joined the Iowa Woman Suffrage Association and organized suffrage events throughout the state, working as a dynamic lecturer and writer.
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  • Thursday, January 05, 2017 4:00 AM
    There is no doubt that antibiotics have saved millions of lives. But, is it all good news? I hope our readers have been noting the increasing number of news stories related to problems with the overuse of antibiotics and the development of resistant bacteria. We have known this was coming for decades, but it has now reached a tipping point. Sally Davies, the Chief Medical Officer of the United Kingdom, has equated the critical health threat of antibiotic resistance to the risk of terrorism. 
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  •   Turn the coffee pot on for this week’s guest
    Thursday, January 05, 2017 4:00 AM
    Get the coffee pots going! At Zach’s, rare was the evening that Wayne, Joan, Velma, Dale, Lorie, Laura, Warner, Nina, Jim and his wife, my guest this week, weren’t in. Most were tired after a hard day’s work; but coffee and camaraderie always perked ‘em up! Well, some great food and wow waitress, too.
    Funny, it was coffee, camaraderie and cards that directed me to my gal at Pizza Hut. I gave her a hug and told her I’d love to interview her and made plans for the next day before she changed her mind. Glad she didn’t as we brewed-up a good time. My Jim hadn’t seen her for a long while, so enjoyed our visit, too.
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