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Thursday, July 27, 2017
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  • Wednesday, July 26, 2017 4:00 AM
    Fellow Hoosiers,
    As I’ve traveled across Indiana these past weeks, many of you have asked me about the federal health care debate. You want to know how legislation may affect us, especially those who rely on Medicaid, our HIP 2.0 program or the federal insurance exchange. You’ve asked about the potential gaps that could be created by reducing federal funding.
    Last week, we saw two separate publicly reported estimates about the impacts of Senate legislation that were $5 billion apart. By tomorrow, there could be other reports with completely different numbers. As I write this, there are rumblings of a potential vote this week. The point is, no one yet knows what the final legislation will contain or whether there will even be agreement to bring a bill to a vote at all.
    Here’s what I do know.
    0 comment(s)
  • Friday, July 21, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    I am with the Montgomery County Historical Society in Crawfordsville, Indiana. I have an inspiring story for your readers. This story is inspiring because our committee of the Montgomery County Historical Society, Tower Committee, has been working for 21 years to restore the Clock Tower to the Historical Victorian Montgomery County Court House. We will continue to work on this project until the tower stands proudly on the top of the Montgomery County Courthouse. Many of our committee members are older retired people who are showing extreme efforts to see this project through. The average age of the members is probably about 80 years old! 
    The courthouse and the tower were erected in 1876 but the tower was removed in 1941 because a painter reported the tower was leaning. It was War time and there was not money to see if this was true and it was hastily taken down. Dr. James Marion Kirtley, a local doctor, came home from the War on leave and discovered the tower was missing. He grieved over that fact as the clocktower was a part of him. He vowed he would someday restore a tower to the most important building in Crawfordsville. However he was to deliver over 5,000 babies, serve as a county commissioner, and the State Senate, and had little time to work on his project.
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  • Friday, July 21, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    I am puzzled by the recent letters to the Editor criticizing the efforts to return a clock tower to the County Courthouse. Most communities find pride in the overt demonstration of productivity and civic concern displayed by architecturally appealing public buildings. One can see a picture of all 92 Indiana County Courthouses at the Indiana Courthouse Square web site: http://indianacourthousesquare.org/courthouses/
    Looking over the other Courthouses it is evident that our Courthouse fits in as being one of the more modest 19th Century buildings. The original clock tower was an integral part of the design of the building from an aesthetic perspective. The removal of the tower changed the entire look and feel of the building, similar to cutting the roof off you car with a chainsaw just so you can have a convertible. You then have a convertible that is functional but rather ugly and not consistent with the original designers vision.
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  • Wednesday, July 19, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    If you are in business, any competition or in opposition, you watch and learn who opposes you and what they are doing. Four or five years ago there was a big invitation-only meeting held by those interested in county-wide zoning. A hush-hush meeting that became known. Since then I have been told many times those wanting zoning are just waiting for what they think is the right moment. Along came the windmill farms and up popped zoning.
    We “no-zoners” thought we had proven we don’t want zoning and for good reason. We had a very large percentage in the rural area particularly against zoning, no zoning signs county-wide, south unit billboard, Chamber of Commerce survey 74 percent against zoning and the political election went well for no zoners. We must remember to vote in the next county election.
    If Crawfordsville and any small towns that are incorporated are exempt from county-wide zoning, who is left? It’s the rural area. The rural area residents are the ones affected by the county-wide zoning and certainly should have a strong voice concerning the zoning. After knocking on many rural Montgomery County doors a few years ago and still talking with rural residents, there is no doubt in my mind that the no zoners are a majority in the rural areas.
    1 comment(s)
  • Tuesday, July 18, 2017 8:49 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Over twenty years of cross country driving, I’ve seen the landscape change in a number of ways. One of the most noticeable changes has been the proliferation of wind farms. 
    Along Interstate 40 in Texas and Oklahoma, wind turbines stretch in every direction as far as the eye can see. Texas produces the most wind power of any state, reaching 23 percent of total electricity production in the first quarter of 2017. The senate bill that propelled Texas to top wind energy producer was signed into law in 1999 by then Governor Bush, allowing Texas farmers and ranchers to earn income from wind turbines on their land, creating clean energy at an affordable cost while growing local rural economies.
    Wind farms supply 25 percent of energy in Oklahoma. With some of the best wind resources in the US., and many new wind farms under construction, Oklahoma is striving to become a manufacturing center for turbines and towers, and several state technical schools have programs to train and certify workers in repairing and servicing wind turbines.
    Iowa and Kansas have also made huge gains in wind energy, with Iowa producing over 36 percent of it’s energy from wind, and Kansas producing around 30 percent.
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:55 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I have a simple question. When the World Health Organization establishes “Guidelines for Community Noise” acknowledging “Critical Health effects” with on-going noise in outdoor living areas at 50/55 dB(A) (decibels) for a time limit of 16 hours, outside bedroom windows at 45 dB(A), school and outdoor playgrounds set at 55 dB(A), sleep disturbance levels is 30 dB(A)- why then, has the county established a wind ordinance at 60 dB(A)- above “critical health effect limits”? (This doesn’t consider health effects by low frequency vibrations (infrasound)- an additional issue.) Please make health of the citizens a priority. Please change the ordinance to safe levels. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 7:54 PM
    Dear Editor,
    I would like to thank all of the businesses that supported our Summer Reading Program this year at the Linden Carnegie Public Library. Thanks to their generous donations we were able to provide exciting and fun programs and also give away great prizes to all of our readers!! Thanks to Random House, HHSB, Lorraine Wilkins & Family, Clark Truck Equipment Co, Inc, Nucor, The Mitchell Agency, Wrede Rock, Applebees, WCI Farms, Pizza Corner, Blankenship Auto Care, County Market, Shear Heaven (Tammy Brummett), Farmer-Forbes & Family, Little Caesar's in West Lafayette, Fugate Lawn and Landscape, Dairy Queen, Kroger South, and Arni’s.
    A special thanks to Valero Ethanol and Mary Broadstreet! They provide our library with prizes, food and so many other goodies it is impossible to list! They are amazing to us and we are so grateful! 
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  • Wednesday, July 12, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    It was with sadness that I learned of the passing of former Crawfordsville High School basketball coach Richard “Dick” Baumgartner.
    In more than 50 years in the newspaper business and eight decades in life I never met a more honest and sincere person. He was humble as well as ever the straight shooter.
    In my first job I covered Crawfordsville’s magical trip to the State Finals in 1958. After our professional relationship, we remained friends and stayed in contact for years.
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  • Saturday, July 08, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    At the city council committee meeting on July 3, an ordinance was proposed to designate Beecher Young Blvd a one-way street from Market to Main. This is the roadway between what is commonly referred to as the Right Weigh Building (just east of the railroad tracks on Market) and Farmers (Grimes) Insurance. It is my understanding that this proposal was put forth (by the city) in response to a request from the out-of-town building owner that, because of wear and tear on his property caused by people driving on it to avoid oncoming traffic (the street is not wide enough to accommodate two-way traffic), he expects the city to be responsible for maintenance of that section of his property.
    The ensuing discussion about this issue took much more time than should have been allotted to the obvious solution, which is to make the street one-way as proposed. The business owner located on that stretch of street was concerned that many of her clients, the bulk of which are elderly, would be confused were they to be confronted with having to enter from Market Street. Looking closely at the two options of entry (Market or Main), it seems to me that the entry from Main could indeed be very confusing with its twists and turns, to say nothing of the railroad crossing that is only feet away from this drive. 
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  • Friday, July 07, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    For many, many years not having county zoning has been blamed for businesses and industry not coming to Montgomery County. Several of those who were outspoken against No Zoning are quiet now. 
    All due respect to Mayor Barton, but I need to use your comments. Mayor Barton brought up “No Zoning” by stating us “No Zoning” folks will find themselves between a rock and a hard place. The county does not regulate land use and ordinances singling out specific use or industry without the backing of overall zoning regulations and the system of due process it provides can only go so far.
    That said, maybe the rest of us “No Zoning” folks better think of the future. For future reference, if we presently had county zoning would the citizens against the windmill farms actually be able to stop the farms? Mayor Barton did not give any assurance with county zoning that the farms could be stopped. 
    Do we “No Zoners” and other Montgomery County citizens have a choice? Yes. One choice. No zoning. Not under county regulations. Many of us have lived with this freedom for years. However, with no zoning, as Mayor Barton explains, the freedom that comes with a lack of land use regulations is appealing but we must remember that equally applies to our neighbor. We as No Zoners realize the equality. We also feel there are state and county regulations now which should help protect us.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, July 06, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    The Montgomery County Commissioners on Monday June 26, 2017 voted to split an expenditure of over $20,000 to have a study conducted to assess possible health risks to the public using the old dump on Whitlock Ave. as a park. How much are the commissioners willing to study/spend adverse effects from Wind Farms??
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, July 06, 2017 4:00 AM
    There has been a lot of discussion recently over a possible wind farm here in Montgomery County, and how it relates to property rights or even government-dictated land use zoning. Residents close to the proposed wind turbine towers are concerned about the health effects, disrupted rural landscape, and what it will do to their property values. The pro-zoning crowd is suggesting county-wide zoning would have somehow stopped the wind turbines from coming or preventing their harm.
    Former county councilman Aaron Morgan and Mayor Todd Barton each recently wrote a newspaper article about it. And both of them did bring up a relevant point: If you are going to defend the property rights and freedom of the individual, you must acknowledge that a property owner has the right to use his property however he sees fit,… (as long as the property owner isn’t preventing someone else from doing the same or causing harm to someone else in the process). But the error both Morgan and Barton made was failing to mention that second part, the do-no-harm clause, which is a pre-requisite for exercising any freedom.
    0 comment(s)
  • Thursday, July 06, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor,
    All members of Flower Lovers Garden Club would like to thank the community for your support of our 14th Garden and Arts Tour. The weather was beautiful and we had the best attendance ever! There are many others who directly assisted in preparation. First and foremost are the home owners who graciously allowed us to tour their gardens, Mark and Denise Patton, Randy and Terri Trinkle, Eric Danzebrink, Steve and Glenda Frees, Bill and Kathy Houghton, Karen Cook, The General Lew Wallace Study and Museum and The Athens Art Gallery. A big thank you to the garden liaisons and helpers for their devoted time and working alongside the garden owners. 
    Also appreciated are the merchants who sold tickets for us, Davidson Greenhouse, ProGreen Garden Center, Country Hearts and Flowers, Milligans Flowers and Gifts, The Montgomery County Visitors and Convention Bureau and Crawfordsville Public library. Paul Furr and Priscilla Zachary were the co-chairs of the event and they were vital to the success of the 2017 Tour, as was each club member who volunteered their help.
    A big thanks goes out to our added attractions and artist, Kenn Clark, Daryl Hutson, Reclaimed by Grace, Alice Harpel, and Carla Earl with Prairie Scents. Bottled water for patrons was donated by Kroger, County Market and Big R. The Paper of Montgomery County and Journal-Review provided much appreciated coverage of our event. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, July 05, 2017 4:00 AM
    Dear Editor, 
    I want to thank you and your employees for putting the Grave Flags For Veterans announcement in The Paper several times again this year. I can always depend on you and The Paper to support our Veterans. We had another successful year in putting the over 2700 flags on nine cemeteries that the Sons of the American Legion is responsible for. 
    0 comment(s)
  • Wednesday, June 28, 2017 9:53 PM
    Dear Editor,
    Just married- 50 years ago, how time flies by! We want to thank all those who sent cards, attended our open house, and those that acknowledged it in any other way. We especially want to thank our children, Chris and Heather, and grandchildren, Jessica and Rian for a job well done planning and overseeing the open house. Thanks also goes out to Cheryl and Madison Guyer, Justin, Brent, and Katie Neier, Jacob Ward, Ed and Patsy Stephens, Cindy Stephens and Beth Kindy. We have been blessed with wonderful family and friends.
    0 comment(s)
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a division of Sagamore News Media

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